Light and Loveliness

Reflections of Emily Sue Allen

Life & Faith / Soulful Simplicity

On Stewardship


Welcome friends.

This is day 26 of Soulful Simplicity, a 31-day series through the month of October. The series can be found here, and I hope you find it enriching and encouraging. If you have any questions or would otherwise like to connect, feel free to send me a note: lightandloveliness [at] gmail [dot] com.

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Stewardship is the responsible management of something entrusted to us. Many people automatically think of stewardship as where you put your financial resources, but stewardship is applicable to many other areas of our lives. We can steward money, time, energy, belongings, and opportunities. We can also steward our households, our relationships, and our own well-being.

Stewardship refers to how we utilize every resource we have—toward fruitfulness or toward wastefulness—based on the intentions we have and the actions we take. 

We can steward all of the above things well, or we can steward them poorly. I find that when I’ve stewarded something well, I am glad to own it and pat myself on the back, but if I’ve done a less than stellar job, I am likely to blame it on something or someone else. It is unfortunate, because even when we make mistakes, we have the opportunity to steward our mistakes well, if we own our choices and learn from them.

Stewardship requires that we keep a focus on ultimate purpose and long-term vision so we don’t squander what we’ve been given care of in the present.

We have a responsibility to use well what we have. We have freedom to do that how we see best, but as we make choices, we have to remember that shortcuts today often mean costs tomorrow. This goes for finances, raising children, marriage, working through problems, and how we spend our time.

Resources come through us—not to us—which is a way of saying, we have the opportunity to multiply what we have been given, and to produce a return on our investment.

For this reason, discernment and discipleship become important in the life of a christian because stewardship requires that we look to Jesus as a compass to discern what is worthy of our time, energy, and perseverance, and also for the strength and diligence we need to put our hands to what needs to be done, even if that means coming face-to-face with things we feel shame about or wish we could ignore. We don’t steward well by accident, but we can steward poorly without giving it a second thought. My prayer is that you will take a look at what stewardship looks like in your life, not because you need to ‘do better’ or ‘perform well’, but because you will ultimately gain more—more freedom, more fullness, more abundance—if you are doing well in these areas on purpose.

“From everyone who has been given much, much will be demanded; and from the one who has been entrusted with much, much more will be asked.” Luke 12:48b NIV

“He who is faithful in a very little thing is faithful also in much; and he who is unrighteous in a very little thing is unrighteous also in much. Therefore if you have not been faithful in the use of unrighteous wealth, who will entrust the true riches to you?” Luke 16:10-11

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